Our guide to

Kenya safaris

Your very own Out of Africa

The word safari means ‘journey’ in Swahili, one of Kenya’s local languages, and a visit to this beautiful country is indeed that.

Covering 582,650 square kilometres it boasts a beautiful coastline on the Indian Ocean, shimmering rift valley lakes, open savannah plains, towering mountains and lush forests that all teem with wildlife.

The history of Kenya is both long and diverse, from its beginnings as a grazing land for Nilotic tribes such as the red-robed Maasai, to the country as it is today, a beautiful land rich in cultures, wilderness and wildlife.

World-renowned for putting on the greatest wildlife show on earth, Kenya is home to the Masai Mara where the wildebeest migration moves through from July to October. Forming part of the Serengeti ecosystem, the Masai Mara has rolling grasslands, meandering rivers and epic escarpments that tower around the wilderness area.

The Masai Mara is known for its predators: the big cats are all here. Add to that large herds of elephant and buffalo, and it makes for jaw-dropping Kenya safari family safaris. Family safaris and the Masai Mara go hand in hand. Imagine spear-throwing classes, body painting, walks in the bush, game drives to lazy picnics listening to Maasai tales. A Kenya safari really is the ultimate experience for families seeking meaningful holidays that fuel big imaginations.

And beyond the Mara there are mountain areas, Great Rift Valley lakes, and vast and magnificent lesser-known reserves that remain largely unexplored.

Lake Nakuru National Park is a favourite stop on any Kenya safari holiday – the lake itself is home to the greatest bird spectacle on earth, thanks to millions of flamingos that are attracted to its shoreline. It’s as pretty as a picture, and its small size makes a visit to the lake an ideal day trip en route between destinations.

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More on Kenya safaris

Facts and figures are not for everyone. So we will keep this brief and interesting, mixing up some statistics and our take on Kenya.

Where is it and what is so special about its history?

Kenya sits on the East coast of Africa and it has seen human habituation for thousands of years. To this day, it’s a truly multicultural melting pot thanks to its colourful history. With a beautiful coastline, Kenya attracted trading like spices and slaves during the Portuguese colonisation days and into the Omani Empire years.

European exploration began moving into Kenya’s interior in the mid 19th century. The British established the East Africa Protectorate in 1895 and then in 1920 it became the Kenya Colony. Kenya was a military base in the First World War for the British. Post-war, the young upper-class British were encouraged to settle here and many descendants remain to this day. During this time, the well-depicted colonial safari was born and enjoyed by many. Today, our guests often wish to step back in time and stay at quintessential tented camps in wilderness settings.

While most people associate Kenya with the great wildebeest migration safari that moves around the Masai Mara between July to October each year, there is so much more to see and do beyond the popular tourist route.

Impressive landscapes

Beyond the Mara there are mountain areas, Great Rift Valley lakes, and vast and magnificent lesser-known reserves that remain largely unexplored.

Lake Nakuru National Park is a favourite stop on any Kenya safari holiday – the lake itself is home to the greatest bird spectacle on earth, thanks to millions of flamingos that are attracted to its shoreline. It’s as pretty as a picture, and its small size makes a visit to the lake an ideal day trip en route between destinations.

The iconic Amboseli National Park is one of Kenya’s oldest and most frequented national parks – and with good reason. Famously towered over by Mount Kilimanjaro, which stands 5,896 metres tall, the park boasts endless panoramic views,flat grasslands, plains and emerald-green swamps that are the playground for impressive elephant herds. There’s also the dry lakebed of Lake Amboseli, which protects impressive wildlife numbers and 425 recorded bird species.

Want to read more? Check out our Kenya safaris travel guide.

Kenya Travel Guide

The best time to visit Kenya

Most destinations on our Kenya safaris shine brightest between January and the end of March, when it’s mostly dry and temperatures are mild.

If the great migration is all you seek then July to October is the ideal time to travel, while the rainy seasons (mid-March to June, and October to December) are still worth considering as you’ll avoid crowds and benefit from fewer tourists and lower price tags.

If a Kenya beach holiday is on the agenda and you want to avoid the extreme heat, we recommend not visiting during March to May, when temperatures – not to mention rainfall – are at their peak.

Conservation in Kenya

Tourism is essential to Kenya’s economy and the conservation of its wilderness, wildlife and community sustainability has never been more important. Kenya is home to some of the most forward-thinking safari initiatives on the continent, where the benefits of your stay are genuinely and equitably shared between lodge-owners and locals. Yet the ongoing battle is land usage and the plight of local pastoralists is warranted. Finding a solution has been essential so that Kenya can provide a livelihood to locals while working hard to ensure the regeneration of land and rehabilitation of wildlife. Kenya has an impressive conservancy model that is working well in numerous parts of the country, allowing operators to pay rent to local tribespeople for use of their land. The benefits are evident for locals and wildlife alike.

Kenya Wildlife Service was established back in 1990 to conserve and manage Kenya’s wildlife. There are designated national parks and reserves on land and in marine areas.

Kenya certainly has had more challenges to overcome than most in the world, with wildlife the major drawcard. With inspirational locals behind the greatest push for protection of wilderness, wildlife and culture, we will continue to support this spectacular safari country. We program our Kenya safaris to ensure each one supports conservation efforts.

Kenya Feedback

From those who have ventured

We had great viewings of cheetah, cheetah babies, vultures feeding, wildebeest, a couple of male lions and flamingos, it was great.

East Africa Explorer – The Smiths

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A 5 star experience and one I would certainly recommend to anyone!

Kenya – Deborah and Bruce

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Our group had a sensational time in Ethiopia and indeed East Africa seeing so much history, culture and breathtaking wilderness and wildlife.

Sensational Ethiopia & East Africa – Air Adventure Group

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